Call to allow food waste in Wollongong green bins - Illawarra Greens

Call to allow food waste in Wollongong green bins

Residents will be allowed to put food waste in their green-lidded bin if the Greens councillors and candidate for Wollongong City Council get their way. Councillor Mithra Cox wants Wollongong Council to introduce a food organics service so food waste is composted not dumped in landfill.  Jamie Dixon, who is vying for a seat on the council in the upcoming ward three byelection, has launched a petition calling on Wollongong Council to adopt a Food Organics and Garden Organics service.

Sign the petition if you agree!

Read the article by Ashleigh Tullis in The Illawarra Mercury, 24 October 2018.

Waste war: Councillor Mithra Cox wants Wollongong Council to introduce a food organics service so food waste is composted not dumped in landfill. Picture: Sylvia Liber

Waste war: Councillor Mithra Cox wants Wollongong Council to introduce a food organics service so food waste is composted not dumped in landfill. Picture: Sylvia Liber

Jamie Dixon, who is vying for a seat on the council in the upcoming ward three byelection, has launched a petition calling on Wollongong Council to adopt a Food Organics and Garden Organics service.

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Mr Dixon said the idea was a “no-brainer” and Wollongong Council should follow the lead of Shellharbour and Kiama councils which had already rolled out the scheme.

“Food waste is the largest component of the rubbish in our red-topped bins,” he said.

“It produces the largest amount of greenhouse gases and odours when it rots in landfill.

“The waste is turned into a nutrient-rich compost. The repurposed fertiliser can then be spread around council parks.”

Mr Dixon said the scheme would benefit residents, the environment and the council.

“The service is a great idea, is achievable and is well within the council’s role,” he said.

“Council pays the state government for every tonne of waste going into landfill, but is able to claim some of those costs back, in order to set up appropriate waste reduction schemes, like FOGO.

“Shellharbour Council received a $1.58 million Environment Protection Authority grant to start their FOGO scheme.

“Kiama Council has reduced its landfill waste by 40 per cent and Shellharbour has reduced it’s waste by nearly 3500 tonnes per year 

“Shellharbour is now stopping more than 60 kilograms of waste per family every year from entering landfill, while producing a sellable product.

“By keeping food waste away from our landfill, we can cut greenhouse gas emissions, as well as greatly reduce odours from council’s Kembla Grange facility.”

Greens Wollongong councillor Mithra Cox said many residents had contacted the council to request a FOGO service in the city.